Thursday Open Thread

What’s going on?

In scary cancer news, the death rate of skin cancer in men has doubled in the past 30 years! Pretty scary, especially considering that this form of cancer is preventable. So ladies, make sure your man wears sunscreen – and get any suspicious moles checked!

In “there’s a light at the end of the tunnel” cancer news. A breast cancer vaccine has been developed which has prevented breast cancer from developing in mice. The trials of the drug in humans are in the planning stages, which means that it can be a while before the vaccine is made available for humans.

If you’re a midnight eater, (or happen to use Ambien), take care of your teeth! Studies have shown that midnight snacking increases the risk of tooth loss, regardless of the type of food eaten.

And, in some fun news – Homer Simpson was named the greatest TV and film character of the last 20 years, according to an Entertainment Weekly survey. What do you think? Do you agree? What fictional characters are your favorite?

Of course, this is an open thread and you are free to disuss whatever you wish. What else is going on?

316 thoughts on “Thursday Open Thread

  1. Sunscreen

    For anyone interested, here is the link for the Environmental Working Group’sSunscreen guide.  They list some good sunscreens, some safety tips and a “hall of shame” (sunscreens that don’t work or don’t have the protection they claim)

    With so many great TV characters, it’s hard to narrow it down!  Off the top of my head:  Elaine (Seinfeld–love the shove/”get out!”), Bill’s quirky mom on Big Love and most of the characters on Modern Family.  The show “The Middle” is growing on me because the awkward daughter is hilarious.  Such great facial expressions:)

    • Sigh.

      They want us to avoid most forms of the only sunscreen my kid is not allergic to (Neutrogena sensitive skin).

        • Don’t work

          You mean you still burn if you wear them? I was wondering whether we should try one of the safer ones. But it’s 10 or 12 bucks every time you buy sunscreen and if my son is going to get an itchy rash from it I don’t want to have to go through 20 different kinds of safe ones before we find one that is workable.

          • sunscreens

            EWG’s database prefers the physical barrier ones, that have zinc oxide in them. The ones that make your skin look pasty. They don’t like the chemical ones, that have oxybenzone in them etc.

            Problem is, they rub off too quickly or you look like Caspar the Ghose. Forget about swimming in them, you jump in the water and they are gone.

            I tried Badger and California Baby and they were both big fails for us. And they are super pricey.

            JMO. Others may have different experiences with them. Skin type might play in too. All I know is I could never send my kid to camp with either of them, he’d be burned to a crisp.

          • divided

            It looks like they divided them up this year

            Their “Top Sunscreens” are the physical barrier ones (zinc oxide and titanium dioxide).

            The “Non Mineral Options” are the chemical ones.

    • I think not having the protection they claim

      is usually beside the point. I mean, really, you don’t need more than 30 or maybe 45 if you’re really fair, because you’ll need to reapply it (because it wears/sweats off) long before the sun protection runs out.

      Remember SPF is a multiplier–how many times longer you can stay in the sun compared to wearing nothing. If you would normally burn in 5 minutes (which is more sensitive than even I am, and I have Irish skin and live at high altitude in the desert), SPF 30 allows you to stay in the sun 2½ hours, and SPF 45, 3 hours and 40 minutes. You should be applying more often than that anyway. So yeah, sure, an “SPF 100+” sunscreen may not actually protect you from burning for 6 hours and 20 minutes, but so what? It would have worn off long before then anyway.

      Or in other words, yes SPF is a huge marketing scam and that’s why Australia doesn’t let companies market sunscreens over SPF 50 (I think) and the FDA is considering doing the same; but unless you’re using very low SPF, I wouldn’t worry about it not being as SPF-tastic as it claims.

      • SPF isn’t my concern

        I don’t like baking chemicals into my skin. In our climate, given the activity level of my kids, I try to use the ones that don’t lie on their label and have few ingredients:)  

        • Well, what you said above was

          they had a hall of shame for “sunscreens that don’t … have the protection they claim.”  I’m just saying, if one’s “SPF 100+” sunscreen doesn’t actually have SPF 100+, I consider that a “duh,” not a reason not to use it.

          I was having this discussion elsewhere, but I find a lot of their bad things sort of suspect. Like anything (anything at all!) you can possibly buy that’s a spray or a powder (including, you know, powder) is automatically marked as bad. Of course a spray can be dangerous if you breathe it in, maybe; but I think most sensible people know that if you’re spraying something, you should spray it away from food, not in an enclosed space, away from your eyes/nose/mouth, then move away from the spray.

      • 30 actually.

        You can’t buy above 30 here. You also can’t buy below 15. I don’t trust American sunscreens…I’ll only use Aussie ones these days.

  2. Sunscreen

    For anyone interested, here is the link for the Environmental Working Group’sSunscreen guide.  They list some good sunscreens, some safety tips and a “hall of shame” (sunscreens that don’t work or don’t have the protection they claim)

    With so many great TV characters, it’s hard to narrow it down!  Off the top of my head:  Elaine (Seinfeld–love the shove/”get out!”), Bill’s quirky mom on Big Love and most of the characters on Modern Family.  The show “The Middle” is growing on me because the awkward daughter is hilarious.  Such great facial expressions:)

    • Sigh.

      They want us to avoid most forms of the only sunscreen my kid is not allergic to (Neutrogena sensitive skin).

        • Don’t work

          You mean you still burn if you wear them? I was wondering whether we should try one of the safer ones. But it’s 10 or 12 bucks every time you buy sunscreen and if my son is going to get an itchy rash from it I don’t want to have to go through 20 different kinds of safe ones before we find one that is workable.

          • sunscreens

            EWG’s database prefers the physical barrier ones, that have zinc oxide in them. The ones that make your skin look pasty. They don’t like the chemical ones, that have oxybenzone in them etc.

            Problem is, they rub off too quickly or you look like Caspar the Ghose. Forget about swimming in them, you jump in the water and they are gone.

            I tried Badger and California Baby and they were both big fails for us. And they are super pricey.

            JMO. Others may have different experiences with them. Skin type might play in too. All I know is I could never send my kid to camp with either of them, he’d be burned to a crisp.

          • divided

            It looks like they divided them up this year

            Their “Top Sunscreens” are the physical barrier ones (zinc oxide and titanium dioxide).

            The “Non Mineral Options” are the chemical ones.

    • I think not having the protection they claim

      is usually beside the point. I mean, really, you don’t need more than 30 or maybe 45 if you’re really fair, because you’ll need to reapply it (because it wears/sweats off) long before the sun protection runs out.

      Remember SPF is a multiplier–how many times longer you can stay in the sun compared to wearing nothing. If you would normally burn in 5 minutes (which is more sensitive than even I am, and I have Irish skin and live at high altitude in the desert), SPF 30 allows you to stay in the sun 2½ hours, and SPF 45, 3 hours and 40 minutes. You should be applying more often than that anyway. So yeah, sure, an “SPF 100+” sunscreen may not actually protect you from burning for 6 hours and 20 minutes, but so what? It would have worn off long before then anyway.

      Or in other words, yes SPF is a huge marketing scam and that’s why Australia doesn’t let companies market sunscreens over SPF 50 (I think) and the FDA is considering doing the same; but unless you’re using very low SPF, I wouldn’t worry about it not being as SPF-tastic as it claims.

      • SPF isn’t my concern

        I don’t like baking chemicals into my skin. In our climate, given the activity level of my kids, I try to use the ones that don’t lie on their label and have few ingredients:)  

        • Well, what you said above was

          they had a hall of shame for “sunscreens that don’t … have the protection they claim.”  I’m just saying, if one’s “SPF 100+” sunscreen doesn’t actually have SPF 100+, I consider that a “duh,” not a reason not to use it.

          I was having this discussion elsewhere, but I find a lot of their bad things sort of suspect. Like anything (anything at all!) you can possibly buy that’s a spray or a powder (including, you know, powder) is automatically marked as bad. Of course a spray can be dangerous if you breathe it in, maybe; but I think most sensible people know that if you’re spraying something, you should spray it away from food, not in an enclosed space, away from your eyes/nose/mouth, then move away from the spray.

      • 30 actually.

        You can’t buy above 30 here. You also can’t buy below 15. I don’t trust American sunscreens…I’ll only use Aussie ones these days.

  3. Loved the list

    There were many I hadn’t heard of but most of them were characters I knew and they were spot on!  Omar Little from The Wire, Buffy, Hannibal Lecter?  There were other great ones as well.  
    My friend’s father died in his fifties from brain cancer that started as melanoma.  Kind of freaks me out because my dad has had the bad kind removed as well.  My mom and sister have had the not so bad stuff removed.  My mom’s doctor said it’s not as much about what you do now but what you did as a kid.  Great.

        • oh feh…it was 20 years ago

          I was a mere child …:-) I barely remember it LOL

          it is what it is… you move on you know?

            • oh i have it down to a science now

              LOL… and truly … you just bounce back and keep on truckin… and in the process gather some REALLY REALLY good morbid jokes and stories for cocktail parties.   Like how I came out to my sister first cuz i knew she was dying so i figured “what the hell…she hates me I only have to deal with it for a few more weeks…”   ;-)  

              ah black humor thy name is Katie

              • You and I really should

                meet somewhere in middle america and just drink and terrorize the locals.

                Reminds me, I’ll send you a picture of my new julian-shaped-skull project I’m doing, entitled Alien Fetal Skull.  :)

                • Well…except I have a New Englander’s

                  fear of flat flyover land
                  but for you I’d make an exception.

                  I once turned my grandpa keeling over onto me in the backseat of a station wagon when I was 14 into a KILLER monologue for an acting class…

                  • Oh, I’m SURE you did

                    I just don’t want to fly all the way out to your coast, is all.  Besides, we’d panic some flat-staters.

                  • hey now

                    I live in some of that flat flyover land!  I can attest that the drinks here are strong and the food is deep fried.  Cheese on everything.  Seems like that should be a redeeming quality of some kind.

    • I believe it

      What your mom’s doctor said about skin cancer.  I also had the not-so-bad type of skin cancer several years ago and it was not a big deal.  (Except it was on my cheek and I had to wear a HUGE bandage for 2 days.)  And my dermatologist told me the same thing.

      The thing was, I hadn’t been out in the sun for any length of time for probably 20 years.  I still got it.  As a teenager (and early 20s), I was a sun-worshipper, and have very fair skin, and got burned VERY badly the first month of summer, until I got a tan.  I was a sitting duck, and no one mentioned skin cancer back then.  Now I pay close attention.  So, if you have ever gotten burned badly, pay attention.

  4. Loved the list

    There were many I hadn’t heard of but most of them were characters I knew and they were spot on!  Omar Little from The Wire, Buffy, Hannibal Lecter?  There were other great ones as well.  
    My friend’s father died in his fifties from brain cancer that started as melanoma.  Kind of freaks me out because my dad has had the bad kind removed as well.  My mom and sister have had the not so bad stuff removed.  My mom’s doctor said it’s not as much about what you do now but what you did as a kid.  Great.

        • oh feh…it was 20 years ago

          I was a mere child …:-) I barely remember it LOL

          it is what it is… you move on you know?

            • oh i have it down to a science now

              LOL… and truly … you just bounce back and keep on truckin… and in the process gather some REALLY REALLY good morbid jokes and stories for cocktail parties.   Like how I came out to my sister first cuz i knew she was dying so i figured “what the hell…she hates me I only have to deal with it for a few more weeks…”   ;-)  

              ah black humor thy name is Katie

              • You and I really should

                meet somewhere in middle america and just drink and terrorize the locals.

                Reminds me, I’ll send you a picture of my new julian-shaped-skull project I’m doing, entitled Alien Fetal Skull.  :)

                • Well…except I have a New Englander’s

                  fear of flat flyover land
                  but for you I’d make an exception.

                  I once turned my grandpa keeling over onto me in the backseat of a station wagon when I was 14 into a KILLER monologue for an acting class…

                  • Oh, I’m SURE you did

                    I just don’t want to fly all the way out to your coast, is all.  Besides, we’d panic some flat-staters.

                  • hey now

                    I live in some of that flat flyover land!  I can attest that the drinks here are strong and the food is deep fried.  Cheese on everything.  Seems like that should be a redeeming quality of some kind.

    • I believe it

      What your mom’s doctor said about skin cancer.  I also had the not-so-bad type of skin cancer several years ago and it was not a big deal.  (Except it was on my cheek and I had to wear a HUGE bandage for 2 days.)  And my dermatologist told me the same thing.

      The thing was, I hadn’t been out in the sun for any length of time for probably 20 years.  I still got it.  As a teenager (and early 20s), I was a sun-worshipper, and have very fair skin, and got burned VERY badly the first month of summer, until I got a tan.  I was a sitting duck, and no one mentioned skin cancer back then.  Now I pay close attention.  So, if you have ever gotten burned badly, pay attention.

  5. Headaches

    Elliet is having headaches every single night and some afternoons.  It’s bad enough that she cries and can’t sleep.  I’m taking her in tomorrow.  It sounds like eye strain but she just had a new prescription done and the headaches started before that.
    I hate the worry.

    • how old is she? could be a few things

      could be allergies which are HORRENDOUS this time of year.
      or.. as I was told last year at Liza’s 10 year checkup — it could be hormonal surges…. AWESOME!

    • children do get migraine.

      Can’t remember if you get migraines, but they are definitely an ailment that runs in families.

      The pattern of hers sounds almost like cluster headaches.  These are a migraine variant that come in clusters.  They are awful…like a migraine on steroids, and often the pain will radiate around an eye or along half of the face.  During a cluster cycle, they will come at the same time very day, and usually at night, and for me, they will come when I try to lay down and sleep or will even wake me up from my sleep.

        • Could be.

          Most of my kids had them as children.  In fact, one of my sons kept complaining about his teeth hurting.  So, off to the dentist we went….nothing wrong with his teeth at all.  Upon questioning him closer, it was the whole left side of his face and head that was hurting.  Migraine.  They present in funny ways with kids…even as “abdominal migraine”, where the pain will present as a stomach ache.

          • we know a kid

            who had migraines where it always presented as stomach pain and vomiting. Took forever to figure out what it was, meanwhile they did all kinds of GI tests on the poor kid.

            I would have thought a physician would KNOW that kind of stuff. Guess not in her case.

    • pain in children

      This is a sensitive spot for me.  My son was diagnosed with Fabry Disease after one episode in which I saw the onset of pain happen right before my eyes.  He was 6 years old and I was already convinced something was not right with him.  But I would not have recognized what I was seeing if I hadn’t seen the expression that crossed his face before the pain hit – it was fear.  That was the clue that told me that “mommy my feet hurt” was not to be dismissed.

      Once I pulled up a tentative diagnosis (biochemical confirmation took months) and began researching, I realized there was a dominant theme in the stories I was reading.  This disease has few symptoms that can be measured before organs begin to fail in early adulthood.  Over and over and over again I saw Fabbers describe pediatricians and specialists telling their parents nothing was wrong.  It doesn’t hurt that badly, he’s a hypochondriac, he just wants to get out of gym class, he’s a whiner, he doesn’t want to do his school work, he’s lazy….  The kids learned to downplay their symptoms and complaints; some even believed their intense pain was normal and that they really were just whiners.  Dropout rates are high because the kids completely fall apart during adolescence.  

      Pain cannot be measured.  There is nothing for a doctor to see; not even my son’s highly specialized pediatric neurologist can detect it.  And children can’t interpret pain accurately.  Which makes you the repository and guardian of your child’s symptoms, even though you can’t really be sure either.  Hang in there, mom – this is a hard one.  

      • this is a difficult one for me, too.

        All of my life, I have had significant symptoms of autonomic failure.  I had constant “spells” as a child.  I had black-outs almost daily, but I thought, hey, this is just normal and other people do this, right?  By junior high school age it became quite clear to me that I couldn’t keep up with other children physically.  However, even by that time, I was afraid to say anything lest I be told that I just wanted attention or was just lazy and not trying.  I don’t blame my parents, because I was the one afraid to mention these things, or, just overlooked them.  To this day, I think my mother harbors guilt, though.

        All that said, no one could have identified a specific problem if I had talked about these things…at the most, a mitral valve prolapse might have been identified earlier as well as a couple of heart rhythm irregularities.  All in all, I still would have been told to just “get over it”.  All of this served to make me a very daring teenager and young adult.  I had something to prove…I wasn’t just “weak”.  I was lucky…nothing bad happened to me as a result of this.

        For me, I don’t know if earlier treatment and identification of the problem would have kept it from progressing.  Probably not…but I can’t even begin to think how my life might have been different.

      • Thank you, Lyn

        Sometimes, especially at first, it was hard to take her seriously because it was at bedtime when they had a million other reasons to get up.  Plus she loves the grape motrin I’ve been giving her.
        I’ve grown to believe something’s definitely going on.  Migraines, dehydration and stress are all possibilities but I’m going to do some research regarding this with her other (seemingly unrelated) symptoms.

          • And pink meat

            When I was first diagnosed, the opthamalogist said to stay away from ham & hot dogs. I was 20, so I wasn’t eating a lot of hot dogs, but I feed them to my kids a lot.

        • bedtime

          My son’s lesser complaints were/are mainly at bedtime.  Now that he is 9 and he understands himself and his body, he has an explanation for this.  When he’s moving around and doing things he’s distracted and doesn’t really notice the aching in his legs and back.  But when he lies still and tries to sleep he can’t forget about it.  

        • one other possibility…

          chemicals/scents. I realized maybe 15-20 years ago that perfumey smells (air freshener, cologne, etc)  or strong chemical smells (paint fumes, asphalt, etc) were triggers for migraines. Once I figured that out and could cut out a lot of smells from my own routine, and also talk frankly to just a few friends whose perfume was hard for me to handle, it changed my life. You might just do a mental inventory (a nasal inventory?) of her daily environment/products/etc to rule it out.

          • Huge problem for me, too.

            Not only gives me migraines but angina attacks as well.  Sometimes just something in the oven downstairs when I’m upstairs can do it.  

  6. Headaches

    Elliet is having headaches every single night and some afternoons.  It’s bad enough that she cries and can’t sleep.  I’m taking her in tomorrow.  It sounds like eye strain but she just had a new prescription done and the headaches started before that.
    I hate the worry.

    • how old is she? could be a few things

      could be allergies which are HORRENDOUS this time of year.
      or.. as I was told last year at Liza’s 10 year checkup — it could be hormonal surges…. AWESOME!

    • children do get migraine.

      Can’t remember if you get migraines, but they are definitely an ailment that runs in families.

      The pattern of hers sounds almost like cluster headaches.  These are a migraine variant that come in clusters.  They are awful…like a migraine on steroids, and often the pain will radiate around an eye or along half of the face.  During a cluster cycle, they will come at the same time very day, and usually at night, and for me, they will come when I try to lay down and sleep or will even wake me up from my sleep.

        • Could be.

          Most of my kids had them as children.  In fact, one of my sons kept complaining about his teeth hurting.  So, off to the dentist we went….nothing wrong with his teeth at all.  Upon questioning him closer, it was the whole left side of his face and head that was hurting.  Migraine.  They present in funny ways with kids…even as “abdominal migraine”, where the pain will present as a stomach ache.

          • we know a kid

            who had migraines where it always presented as stomach pain and vomiting. Took forever to figure out what it was, meanwhile they did all kinds of GI tests on the poor kid.

            I would have thought a physician would KNOW that kind of stuff. Guess not in her case.

    • pain in children

      This is a sensitive spot for me.  My son was diagnosed with Fabry Disease after one episode in which I saw the onset of pain happen right before my eyes.  He was 6 years old and I was already convinced something was not right with him.  But I would not have recognized what I was seeing if I hadn’t seen the expression that crossed his face before the pain hit – it was fear.  That was the clue that told me that “mommy my feet hurt” was not to be dismissed.

      Once I pulled up a tentative diagnosis (biochemical confirmation took months) and began researching, I realized there was a dominant theme in the stories I was reading.  This disease has few symptoms that can be measured before organs begin to fail in early adulthood.  Over and over and over again I saw Fabbers describe pediatricians and specialists telling their parents nothing was wrong.  It doesn’t hurt that badly, he’s a hypochondriac, he just wants to get out of gym class, he’s a whiner, he doesn’t want to do his school work, he’s lazy….  The kids learned to downplay their symptoms and complaints; some even believed their intense pain was normal and that they really were just whiners.  Dropout rates are high because the kids completely fall apart during adolescence.  

      Pain cannot be measured.  There is nothing for a doctor to see; not even my son’s highly specialized pediatric neurologist can detect it.  And children can’t interpret pain accurately.  Which makes you the repository and guardian of your child’s symptoms, even though you can’t really be sure either.  Hang in there, mom – this is a hard one.  

      • this is a difficult one for me, too.

        All of my life, I have had significant symptoms of autonomic failure.  I had constant “spells” as a child.  I had black-outs almost daily, but I thought, hey, this is just normal and other people do this, right?  By junior high school age it became quite clear to me that I couldn’t keep up with other children physically.  However, even by that time, I was afraid to say anything lest I be told that I just wanted attention or was just lazy and not trying.  I don’t blame my parents, because I was the one afraid to mention these things, or, just overlooked them.  To this day, I think my mother harbors guilt, though.

        All that said, no one could have identified a specific problem if I had talked about these things…at the most, a mitral valve prolapse might have been identified earlier as well as a couple of heart rhythm irregularities.  All in all, I still would have been told to just “get over it”.  All of this served to make me a very daring teenager and young adult.  I had something to prove…I wasn’t just “weak”.  I was lucky…nothing bad happened to me as a result of this.

        For me, I don’t know if earlier treatment and identification of the problem would have kept it from progressing.  Probably not…but I can’t even begin to think how my life might have been different.

      • Thank you, Lyn

        Sometimes, especially at first, it was hard to take her seriously because it was at bedtime when they had a million other reasons to get up.  Plus she loves the grape motrin I’ve been giving her.
        I’ve grown to believe something’s definitely going on.  Migraines, dehydration and stress are all possibilities but I’m going to do some research regarding this with her other (seemingly unrelated) symptoms.

          • And pink meat

            When I was first diagnosed, the opthamalogist said to stay away from ham & hot dogs. I was 20, so I wasn’t eating a lot of hot dogs, but I feed them to my kids a lot.

        • bedtime

          My son’s lesser complaints were/are mainly at bedtime.  Now that he is 9 and he understands himself and his body, he has an explanation for this.  When he’s moving around and doing things he’s distracted and doesn’t really notice the aching in his legs and back.  But when he lies still and tries to sleep he can’t forget about it.  

        • one other possibility…

          chemicals/scents. I realized maybe 15-20 years ago that perfumey smells (air freshener, cologne, etc)  or strong chemical smells (paint fumes, asphalt, etc) were triggers for migraines. Once I figured that out and could cut out a lot of smells from my own routine, and also talk frankly to just a few friends whose perfume was hard for me to handle, it changed my life. You might just do a mental inventory (a nasal inventory?) of her daily environment/products/etc to rule it out.

          • Huge problem for me, too.

            Not only gives me migraines but angina attacks as well.  Sometimes just something in the oven downstairs when I’m upstairs can do it.  

  7. WWMTD

    Ok the baby is OBSESSED with this Sesame Street book (Twiddlebugs at work).. He doesn’t want to listen to the story, he just wants to point at the characters pictured on the endpapers and have me say their names.  “eh?” “that’s Big Bird” “eh?” “that’s Mumford, I think.” “eh?” “Ernie!” “eh?” “That’s Bert”

    I run out of patience about the fifth time in a row. “Yep. That’s. BIG. BIRD.”  

    What is he doing and why??  What can I do to make this not such torture for me?  He’s been obsessed with this book since forever, I had actually stashed it away for a while and only brought it out again since I.. why did I bring it out.. I thought he was talking more and we could talk more about it.  No, it’s just grunting and pointing still.  And when I get tired and close my eyes he hits me with it.

    I want to re-hide the book.  Reasons not to?

    • Screaming?

      I mean, that might not be a reason not to. If he’s going to scream for it. I forget how old he is.

      How long is his attention span? Can you talk more about it? Like “That’s Big Bird, he’s really tall but he’s actually only 6 years old and just starting school, he used to have this imaginary friend named Snuffleupagus…” At least then each character would take longer so hopefully you could do only one repetition before he lost interest. I hope. If his attention span is infinite, then I definitely vote for hiding.

      Who’s Mumford?

      • the Amazing Mumford

        The magician who always said “A la peanut butter sandwiches.”

        (I think you’re younger than some of us–maybe he was no longer around on Sesame Street when you were the age to watch?  I remember him pretty vividly.)

        • No, I remember him.

          I had a vague memory of “purple” when I read it, but wasn’t sure that was right. When you said “magician” I knew who you meant.

          Wikipedia seems to think he’s actually still on the show.

      • He’s 2

        almost.

        Mumford the Magician? LOL.  It’s an ollllllld book, no Elmo, thank HEAVENS or it would already be in the compost.

        No, his attention span seems to be infinite.  His other favorite book is a Unicef production called “Children Just like Me” that he likes to look at but I don’t mind looking at it too.

        • In that case, as I said

          I vote for hiding.

          I remember Elmo’s introduction, but he didn’t become a big deal until after I quit watching.

        • Um…that happens at our house

          Sometimes things just…disappear. Especially if they have batteries. Or if the batteries die, oh well, just have to play with it without all the noises. Except DS is starting to realize that new batteries can be purchased…dang.

        • That’s because

          deep down you realize that you’re stunting his cognitive development by failing to fully indulge and satisfy his instinctive drive to … aw, f’k it, just throw the damn thing into the recycling bin.  Life’s too short; let him develop other methods for driving you batshit crazy.  

          • throw it

            Throw it in the GARBAGE! Or the big dumpster that sits on your driveway. Oh wait that’s just me.

            Send it to the dump!

            (i kid, i kid)

                • maybe so

                  ……………… I tried to picture it but I just can’t.  There are very few books I can bring myself to trash. I just have this thing about books. I have ceremoniously dumped horrible books right onto the coffee grounds & eggshells but this one isn’t that bad :)

                  • Disintegration art

                    I was just reading about this, where you make a bundle of paper or other materials, hang it outside for a few months (over winter is good) and see what it turns into or what you can make out of it.

    • Sounds pretty typical

      Kids that age are working so much on their speech.  Recognizing characters is a developmental skill, too, from what the developmental nurse told us.  If it is driving you nuts give the book a break but the repetition is a learning strategy.

      • he actually

        was really into the book before he ever saw the show.  Props to the puppet designers I guess. Cookie Monster’s big eyes are very affecting I suppose.

        Repetition, yeah.

      • we are so there

        Yeah. Thank goodness somebody told me with Jess that repetition is a learning strategy (probably here on MT), because otherwise I would’ve gone stir crazy. Jess had a book of nursery rhymes that easily got 10-12x repetitions in a day. Lily, now 14 months, has a book called “The Twelve Days of Australian Christmas” that is in heavy rotation. I am apparently the only one that does it with appropriate singing/dramatics, so it’s all me.

    • Because he’s about 2

      My kids all did this and yes I hid certain books for a while when I needed a break.  I think what he is doing is developmentally appropriate.  After this phase he’ll probably start pointing and naming on his own.  My oldest is in K now and he took to reading like a duck to water this year so whatever it is must work for their little brains.  

      We had quite a few books during this phase that were just picture dictionaries with labels and no stories.  There is a really nice Richard Scarry one that is broken into categories like Foods, Transportation, things on a breakfast table, flowers, animals, insects.  It is really nice but I think I even had to hide that one for a while.

      FWIW my daughter took to actual stories sooner than the boys.  This phase didn’t last as long with her.  It could be a gender thing.

    • Reasons not to?

      Well, I sympathize with you.  But, while I hope I don’t sound like a PC thug, I’d say the reason not to hide it is that he loves it.  He’s getting something out of it.  Babies do like repetition.  He’ll grow out of it.

  8. WWMTD

    Ok the baby is OBSESSED with this Sesame Street book (Twiddlebugs at work).. He doesn’t want to listen to the story, he just wants to point at the characters pictured on the endpapers and have me say their names.  “eh?” “that’s Big Bird” “eh?” “that’s Mumford, I think.” “eh?” “Ernie!” “eh?” “That’s Bert”

    I run out of patience about the fifth time in a row. “Yep. That’s. BIG. BIRD.”  

    What is he doing and why??  What can I do to make this not such torture for me?  He’s been obsessed with this book since forever, I had actually stashed it away for a while and only brought it out again since I.. why did I bring it out.. I thought he was talking more and we could talk more about it.  No, it’s just grunting and pointing still.  And when I get tired and close my eyes he hits me with it.

    I want to re-hide the book.  Reasons not to?

    • Screaming?

      I mean, that might not be a reason not to. If he’s going to scream for it. I forget how old he is.

      How long is his attention span? Can you talk more about it? Like “That’s Big Bird, he’s really tall but he’s actually only 6 years old and just starting school, he used to have this imaginary friend named Snuffleupagus…” At least then each character would take longer so hopefully you could do only one repetition before he lost interest. I hope. If his attention span is infinite, then I definitely vote for hiding.

      Who’s Mumford?

      • the Amazing Mumford

        The magician who always said “A la peanut butter sandwiches.”

        (I think you’re younger than some of us–maybe he was no longer around on Sesame Street when you were the age to watch?  I remember him pretty vividly.)

        • No, I remember him.

          I had a vague memory of “purple” when I read it, but wasn’t sure that was right. When you said “magician” I knew who you meant.

          Wikipedia seems to think he’s actually still on the show.

      • He’s 2

        almost.

        Mumford the Magician? LOL.  It’s an ollllllld book, no Elmo, thank HEAVENS or it would already be in the compost.

        No, his attention span seems to be infinite.  His other favorite book is a Unicef production called “Children Just like Me” that he likes to look at but I don’t mind looking at it too.

        • In that case, as I said

          I vote for hiding.

          I remember Elmo’s introduction, but he didn’t become a big deal until after I quit watching.

        • Um…that happens at our house

          Sometimes things just…disappear. Especially if they have batteries. Or if the batteries die, oh well, just have to play with it without all the noises. Except DS is starting to realize that new batteries can be purchased…dang.

        • That’s because

          deep down you realize that you’re stunting his cognitive development by failing to fully indulge and satisfy his instinctive drive to … aw, f’k it, just throw the damn thing into the recycling bin.  Life’s too short; let him develop other methods for driving you batshit crazy.  

          • throw it

            Throw it in the GARBAGE! Or the big dumpster that sits on your driveway. Oh wait that’s just me.

            Send it to the dump!

            (i kid, i kid)

                • maybe so

                  ……………… I tried to picture it but I just can’t.  There are very few books I can bring myself to trash. I just have this thing about books. I have ceremoniously dumped horrible books right onto the coffee grounds & eggshells but this one isn’t that bad :)

                  • Disintegration art

                    I was just reading about this, where you make a bundle of paper or other materials, hang it outside for a few months (over winter is good) and see what it turns into or what you can make out of it.

    • Sounds pretty typical

      Kids that age are working so much on their speech.  Recognizing characters is a developmental skill, too, from what the developmental nurse told us.  If it is driving you nuts give the book a break but the repetition is a learning strategy.

      • he actually

        was really into the book before he ever saw the show.  Props to the puppet designers I guess. Cookie Monster’s big eyes are very affecting I suppose.

        Repetition, yeah.

      • we are so there

        Yeah. Thank goodness somebody told me with Jess that repetition is a learning strategy (probably here on MT), because otherwise I would’ve gone stir crazy. Jess had a book of nursery rhymes that easily got 10-12x repetitions in a day. Lily, now 14 months, has a book called “The Twelve Days of Australian Christmas” that is in heavy rotation. I am apparently the only one that does it with appropriate singing/dramatics, so it’s all me.

    • Because he’s about 2

      My kids all did this and yes I hid certain books for a while when I needed a break.  I think what he is doing is developmentally appropriate.  After this phase he’ll probably start pointing and naming on his own.  My oldest is in K now and he took to reading like a duck to water this year so whatever it is must work for their little brains.  

      We had quite a few books during this phase that were just picture dictionaries with labels and no stories.  There is a really nice Richard Scarry one that is broken into categories like Foods, Transportation, things on a breakfast table, flowers, animals, insects.  It is really nice but I think I even had to hide that one for a while.

      FWIW my daughter took to actual stories sooner than the boys.  This phase didn’t last as long with her.  It could be a gender thing.

    • Reasons not to?

      Well, I sympathize with you.  But, while I hope I don’t sound like a PC thug, I’d say the reason not to hide it is that he loves it.  He’s getting something out of it.  Babies do like repetition.  He’ll grow out of it.

  9. bone tired

    On Monday, DH, the girls and I went on a lovely Memorial Day picnic with our canoe at the state park near our house.  He slipped on some rocks and whacked his elbow.  I took him to the doctor on Tuesday (he didn’t see the point of going to the emergency room because he figured all he’d do was wait around and he could do that just as well at home).  We thought he’d pulled a tendon–turned out that he fractured his radius.  None of us has ever broken a bone so we had no idea what we were dealing with.

    He’s now in a cast, can’t go to work for a couple weeks, and can’t drive.  We’re struggling with transportation for the kids (I work an hour away and it’s difficult for me to pick them up from school, which we have to do three days a week).  He’s in constant pain–largely because of the incredibly tight cast wrapping on his hand, not because of the actual broken bone–and is having a terrible time sleeping, which of course makes me have a terrible time sleeping.  It’s so hard.  He’s very independent and is having an awful time with needing to ask for help for stupid little things (and of course it’s his dominant hand that’s affected).  

    DSD’s birthday is tomorrow and I’m completely behind on shopping and planning, etc. because of transportation and support needs–thank God she’s old enough to be mature about it (and she’s actually been a really good help with him).

    I’m so glad it’s a relatively minor fracture and he’ll only have to be in the thing for a couple weeks–don’t know how long either of us could stand longer than that.

    • OK, I broke my growth plate many years ago

      and if the cast is tight enough that it’s painful enough to keep him up, then it’s too tight (unless it’s only too tight for the time being, because of the swelling). If it still hurts in a few days, he needs to go back.

      And I’m perplexed why he can’t go to work for a couple of weeks? I guess I don’t know what he did, but my doctor told my mother that keeping me out of school for more than one day was totally excessive, and a broken growth plate is not at all a “relatively minor fracture,” it needed some serious outpatient surgery and my wrist is still deformed (never grew properly after that).

      • liability

        is a big part of it.  His night job is in a group home and he’s not allowed to be on duty because he can’t perform restraints (in spite of the fact that the guys in his house are pretty high-functioning and we can’t remember the last time anything like that was needed).  His day job is in a public school and unless he’s got specific clearance from his doctor they don’t want him working with the kids physically, largely because if he exacerbates the problem through work they don’t want to be liable for it.

        Honestly, given that he works seven days a week (except for two months in the summer when his day job isn’t contracted), this is, in a way, a rare treat.  It’s kind of a shame that he had to go to this length for a break!

      • my stepson

        lives in another town 45 minutes away, and he doesn’t drive (his ADHD has limited him enough that we’ve been reluctant to get him behind the wheel; DH has taught him a little bit but isn’t going further than that, and paying for insurance for him would be impossible).

        I’m thinking of asking the mom of one of younger DSD’s friends to give us a little help–we’re not very close but she’s very nice and I think it wouldn’t be too much out of her way to pick up our girls when she picks up hers.  (We don’t live in their school district, which is why they can’t just take the bus to our house–in spite of the fact that they’re actually with us a heck of a lot more than they are with her, we didn’t fight their mom on residential custody because we didn’t want to pull them out of that wonderful school system.)

        I’m hoping he’ll be able to get in touch with the orthopedist today about the tightness of the cast.  He tried yesterday but they didn’t call back.

        • I hope you get help!

          I hope you can get some help from people.  I know what it’s like to not have people you are close with, hopefully they can help you out some.

          DS doesn’t ride the bus either bc he goes to an out of district magnet.

        • The cast should not be painful

          When I broke my arm not long ago the initial cast was also too tight.  You don’t want to leave that too long as it could be hampering circulation.  It was the beginning of the weekend, so the urgent care doc sliced into it at the tighter end (which was nearer the break) to open it up and release the pressure, then wrapped it in a bandage so it continued to provide support.  Then the orthopod recasted it the next week.

          • oh, now

            that’s going to freak me out–especially because he worries about his circulation anyway, with his diabetes.  The actual injury never seemed very swollen in the first place–nowhere near as bad as his ankles get if he sprains them, for instance–so I don’t think the tightness is due to that.  I really want that orthopedist to call him back. . .

            At least he told me that he got a friend to help with the transport next week, so that’s one huge load off.

    • oh dear

      and I think I totally mis-read this on FB as  a child with a fracture.

      I would inquire about the incredibly tight cast [unless you already have, of course]. It seems like maybe it was made too tight? Of course I am no MD, but I can’t remember knowing anyone who was in pain from their cast — irritated and itchy, maybe, but not pain. Seems like maybe that’s not supposed to happen?

      ugh, so very sorry and hope for quick healing.

  10. bone tired

    On Monday, DH, the girls and I went on a lovely Memorial Day picnic with our canoe at the state park near our house.  He slipped on some rocks and whacked his elbow.  I took him to the doctor on Tuesday (he didn’t see the point of going to the emergency room because he figured all he’d do was wait around and he could do that just as well at home).  We thought he’d pulled a tendon–turned out that he fractured his radius.  None of us has ever broken a bone so we had no idea what we were dealing with.

    He’s now in a cast, can’t go to work for a couple weeks, and can’t drive.  We’re struggling with transportation for the kids (I work an hour away and it’s difficult for me to pick them up from school, which we have to do three days a week).  He’s in constant pain–largely because of the incredibly tight cast wrapping on his hand, not because of the actual broken bone–and is having a terrible time sleeping, which of course makes me have a terrible time sleeping.  It’s so hard.  He’s very independent and is having an awful time with needing to ask for help for stupid little things (and of course it’s his dominant hand that’s affected).  

    DSD’s birthday is tomorrow and I’m completely behind on shopping and planning, etc. because of transportation and support needs–thank God she’s old enough to be mature about it (and she’s actually been a really good help with him).

    I’m so glad it’s a relatively minor fracture and he’ll only have to be in the thing for a couple weeks–don’t know how long either of us could stand longer than that.

    • OK, I broke my growth plate many years ago

      and if the cast is tight enough that it’s painful enough to keep him up, then it’s too tight (unless it’s only too tight for the time being, because of the swelling). If it still hurts in a few days, he needs to go back.

      And I’m perplexed why he can’t go to work for a couple of weeks? I guess I don’t know what he did, but my doctor told my mother that keeping me out of school for more than one day was totally excessive, and a broken growth plate is not at all a “relatively minor fracture,” it needed some serious outpatient surgery and my wrist is still deformed (never grew properly after that).

      • liability

        is a big part of it.  His night job is in a group home and he’s not allowed to be on duty because he can’t perform restraints (in spite of the fact that the guys in his house are pretty high-functioning and we can’t remember the last time anything like that was needed).  His day job is in a public school and unless he’s got specific clearance from his doctor they don’t want him working with the kids physically, largely because if he exacerbates the problem through work they don’t want to be liable for it.

        Honestly, given that he works seven days a week (except for two months in the summer when his day job isn’t contracted), this is, in a way, a rare treat.  It’s kind of a shame that he had to go to this length for a break!

      • my stepson

        lives in another town 45 minutes away, and he doesn’t drive (his ADHD has limited him enough that we’ve been reluctant to get him behind the wheel; DH has taught him a little bit but isn’t going further than that, and paying for insurance for him would be impossible).

        I’m thinking of asking the mom of one of younger DSD’s friends to give us a little help–we’re not very close but she’s very nice and I think it wouldn’t be too much out of her way to pick up our girls when she picks up hers.  (We don’t live in their school district, which is why they can’t just take the bus to our house–in spite of the fact that they’re actually with us a heck of a lot more than they are with her, we didn’t fight their mom on residential custody because we didn’t want to pull them out of that wonderful school system.)

        I’m hoping he’ll be able to get in touch with the orthopedist today about the tightness of the cast.  He tried yesterday but they didn’t call back.

        • I hope you get help!

          I hope you can get some help from people.  I know what it’s like to not have people you are close with, hopefully they can help you out some.

          DS doesn’t ride the bus either bc he goes to an out of district magnet.

        • The cast should not be painful

          When I broke my arm not long ago the initial cast was also too tight.  You don’t want to leave that too long as it could be hampering circulation.  It was the beginning of the weekend, so the urgent care doc sliced into it at the tighter end (which was nearer the break) to open it up and release the pressure, then wrapped it in a bandage so it continued to provide support.  Then the orthopod recasted it the next week.

          • oh, now

            that’s going to freak me out–especially because he worries about his circulation anyway, with his diabetes.  The actual injury never seemed very swollen in the first place–nowhere near as bad as his ankles get if he sprains them, for instance–so I don’t think the tightness is due to that.  I really want that orthopedist to call him back. . .

            At least he told me that he got a friend to help with the transport next week, so that’s one huge load off.

    • oh dear

      and I think I totally mis-read this on FB as  a child with a fracture.

      I would inquire about the incredibly tight cast [unless you already have, of course]. It seems like maybe it was made too tight? Of course I am no MD, but I can’t remember knowing anyone who was in pain from their cast — irritated and itchy, maybe, but not pain. Seems like maybe that’s not supposed to happen?

      ugh, so very sorry and hope for quick healing.

  11. Art, TV and murder

    Good subject, right?

    So, Art.  We’re doing a vote right now on two shows, Nursery Rhymes and Irises over at EBSQ.  If you have nothing better to do this week, could you pop over and vote for your favorite piece?  I ask you to vote for the one you like the best, even if it isn’t mine, just to keep things honest.  They are some really nice pieces, though.

    All of my favorite characters are in dorky cult-hit shows, so I won’t even post them.  :)

    Oh, and Pabs is off testifying at the murder trial today.  It makes me queasy, both having him involved and knowing what that horrible man did to his wife, but I’m glad Pablo is able to help make it right.  “Allegedly” abused her in the past indeed.

  12. Art, TV and murder

    Good subject, right?

    So, Art.  We’re doing a vote right now on two shows, Nursery Rhymes and Irises over at EBSQ.  If you have nothing better to do this week, could you pop over and vote for your favorite piece?  I ask you to vote for the one you like the best, even if it isn’t mine, just to keep things honest.  They are some really nice pieces, though.

    All of my favorite characters are in dorky cult-hit shows, so I won’t even post them.  :)

    Oh, and Pabs is off testifying at the murder trial today.  It makes me queasy, both having him involved and knowing what that horrible man did to his wife, but I’m glad Pablo is able to help make it right.  “Allegedly” abused her in the past indeed.

  13. Skin cancer in US males

    From the CDC (emphasis mine):

    Skin Cancer Trends
    Note: The word “significantly” below refers to statistical significance. 2006 is the latest year for which data are available.
    Incidence Trends

    In the United States, incidence of melanoma of the skin has—

       * Increased significantly by 3.1% per year from 1986 to 2006 among men.
       * Increased significantly by 3.0% per year from 1993 to 2006 among women.

    Among whites, incidence has—

       * Increased significantly by 2.7% per year from 1997 to 2006 among men.
       * Increased significantly by 3.3% per year from 1997 to 2006 among women.

    Mortality Trends

    In the United States, deaths from melanoma of the skin have—

       * Increased significantly by 2.0% per year from 2002 to 2006 among men.

    Among whites, deaths have—

       * Remained level from 1997 to 2006 among men.

    • there ya go again

      always being the voice of reason. :-)

      Maybe it’s ’cause my DH is bald but I say to all men “wear a hat!”

      • good advice

        My DH had a basal cell carcinoma removed last year and guess where it was…right on top of his head, where his hair had thinned and no longer provided enough protection.

        He no longer leaves the house without a hat.

  14. Skin cancer in US males

    From the CDC (emphasis mine):

    Skin Cancer Trends
    Note: The word “significantly” below refers to statistical significance. 2006 is the latest year for which data are available.
    Incidence Trends

    In the United States, incidence of melanoma of the skin has—

       * Increased significantly by 3.1% per year from 1986 to 2006 among men.
       * Increased significantly by 3.0% per year from 1993 to 2006 among women.

    Among whites, incidence has—

       * Increased significantly by 2.7% per year from 1997 to 2006 among men.
       * Increased significantly by 3.3% per year from 1997 to 2006 among women.

    Mortality Trends

    In the United States, deaths from melanoma of the skin have—

       * Increased significantly by 2.0% per year from 2002 to 2006 among men.

    Among whites, deaths have—

       * Remained level from 1997 to 2006 among men.

    • there ya go again

      always being the voice of reason. :-)

      Maybe it’s ’cause my DH is bald but I say to all men “wear a hat!”

      • good advice

        My DH had a basal cell carcinoma removed last year and guess where it was…right on top of his head, where his hair had thinned and no longer provided enough protection.

        He no longer leaves the house without a hat.

  15. Rue Mclanahan has died!

    Apparently she had another stroke this morning. I am so sad. I grew up watching the Golden Girls and I just loved her.

    • Wow, it’s true

      After hearing about Gary Coleman & Dennis Hopper over the weekend, I said to DH, “Who will be the third star to die?” Weird. Or complete & utter superstition.

      • well

        I have had two friends die in the past week, does that count?

        Last Friday, the 94 year old, oldest and longest-standing member of our little church died. He had joined our church when he was a student at University of Texas in the 30s. He was quite a gentleman.

        And then yesterday I learned that one of my friends from college and law school, former roommate of my brother, died in his sleep Wednesday night. I don’t know any other details; we’d last been in touch a few years ago. But he was 49, way too young.  

        With Rue dying now, I am just hoping we aren’t facing another “summer of death” like last summer seemed to be.

        And BTW, have y’all read any more about Gary Coleman’s death? Cause it seems to raise all kinds of questions — like his “wife” called 911 and said he was downstairs and she thought he fell — but she didn’t want to go down there to look and see. Finally the operator talked her into going downstairs, and while the operator was telling her to put pressure on his wound, she was saying “I’m freaking out, there’s blood on me” and not doing it? And then according to Entertainment Tonight [I know, just go with me here], she isn’t even his wife — they divorced awhile back. But she presented herself as the wife to the hospital and she made the decision to pull the plug.

        Maybe there was nothing else to be done for him, regardless, but what a weird story.

        • okay, never mind about that last part

          I have it on good authority from celebrity gossip sites that the ex-wife had legal right to make health decisions on Gary’s behalf.

        • That is just terrible

          Three celebrities are interesting, but not terribly heart-breaking. Two friends is really, really sad.

          The Coleman case is weird, unfortunately. Guess he still won’t have much peace for awhile. What interests me is I read he had returned from a grueling dialysis session and perhaps collapsed because of that. My MIL, who’s coming to visit Sun. for a few weeks, started dialysis two or three months ago, and it’s kind of imprecise at the moment. It’s an experiement to see what is the right combination for her. Just over the weekend, she was hospitalized for dehydration. She has not gone two weeks without being in the hospital since Nov. We all want to see her so badly, but I’m nervous as to what will happen. But if anything does, I’m not going to be a ball sack like that chick!

  16. Rue Mclanahan has died!

    Apparently she had another stroke this morning. I am so sad. I grew up watching the Golden Girls and I just loved her.

    • Wow, it’s true

      After hearing about Gary Coleman & Dennis Hopper over the weekend, I said to DH, “Who will be the third star to die?” Weird. Or complete & utter superstition.

      • well

        I have had two friends die in the past week, does that count?

        Last Friday, the 94 year old, oldest and longest-standing member of our little church died. He had joined our church when he was a student at University of Texas in the 30s. He was quite a gentleman.

        And then yesterday I learned that one of my friends from college and law school, former roommate of my brother, died in his sleep Wednesday night. I don’t know any other details; we’d last been in touch a few years ago. But he was 49, way too young.  

        With Rue dying now, I am just hoping we aren’t facing another “summer of death” like last summer seemed to be.

        And BTW, have y’all read any more about Gary Coleman’s death? Cause it seems to raise all kinds of questions — like his “wife” called 911 and said he was downstairs and she thought he fell — but she didn’t want to go down there to look and see. Finally the operator talked her into going downstairs, and while the operator was telling her to put pressure on his wound, she was saying “I’m freaking out, there’s blood on me” and not doing it? And then according to Entertainment Tonight [I know, just go with me here], she isn’t even his wife — they divorced awhile back. But she presented herself as the wife to the hospital and she made the decision to pull the plug.

        Maybe there was nothing else to be done for him, regardless, but what a weird story.

        • okay, never mind about that last part

          I have it on good authority from celebrity gossip sites that the ex-wife had legal right to make health decisions on Gary’s behalf.

        • That is just terrible

          Three celebrities are interesting, but not terribly heart-breaking. Two friends is really, really sad.

          The Coleman case is weird, unfortunately. Guess he still won’t have much peace for awhile. What interests me is I read he had returned from a grueling dialysis session and perhaps collapsed because of that. My MIL, who’s coming to visit Sun. for a few weeks, started dialysis two or three months ago, and it’s kind of imprecise at the moment. It’s an experiement to see what is the right combination for her. Just over the weekend, she was hospitalized for dehydration. She has not gone two weeks without being in the hospital since Nov. We all want to see her so badly, but I’m nervous as to what will happen. But if anything does, I’m not going to be a ball sack like that chick!

        • …and I love you anyway

          (although I think we need to talk Katie into piercing or tattooing something…she’s not really enough of a rebel).

          • I have my ears pierced thank you very much

            with a double piercein one ear.  
            and i’m marrying a woman with three tatoos..

            and if you don’t think a catholic good girl finally ending a marriage, coming out of the closet at the age of 37, meeting the woman of her dreams and nearly 7 years to the day later marrying her …all while being an out parent of a child at a Catholic School then I say to you .

            feh. you don’t KNOW from rebelling…

                    • :) Huge grin

                      I actually don’t see tattoos and piercings as rebellion, and I think it is a huge generational thing, too.  We just like teasing you about sounding like a grumpy old conservative, Katie…you know that.  :)

                • Fair

                  but my tattoos aren’t about rebelling, they’re about decorating me.  So there, how’s that for rebelling?

        • …and I love you anyway

          (although I think we need to talk Katie into piercing or tattooing something…she’s not really enough of a rebel).

          • I have my ears pierced thank you very much

            with a double piercein one ear.  
            and i’m marrying a woman with three tatoos..

            and if you don’t think a catholic good girl finally ending a marriage, coming out of the closet at the age of 37, meeting the woman of her dreams and nearly 7 years to the day later marrying her …all while being an out parent of a child at a Catholic School then I say to you .

            feh. you don’t KNOW from rebelling…

                    • :) Huge grin

                      I actually don’t see tattoos and piercings as rebellion, and I think it is a huge generational thing, too.  We just like teasing you about sounding like a grumpy old conservative, Katie…you know that.  :)

                • Fair

                  but my tattoos aren’t about rebelling, they’re about decorating me.  So there, how’s that for rebelling?

  17. this is good news, I think

    Joran van der Sloot has been arrested.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/

    This is the man who was suspected of killing Natalee Holloway, and is now a suspect in another woman’s murder.

    I hope they can make it stick this time [only if he is guilty, of course, but I mean, seriously, how many rich white dudes are wrongly accused in two separate murders? probably not many]

  18. this is good news, I think

    Joran van der Sloot has been arrested.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/

    This is the man who was suspected of killing Natalee Holloway, and is now a suspect in another woman’s murder.

    I hope they can make it stick this time [only if he is guilty, of course, but I mean, seriously, how many rich white dudes are wrongly accused in two separate murders? probably not many]

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